FSP Hits 1,000 “Early Movers”

The Free State Project has officially signed up 1,000 early movers who have agreed to relocate to New Hampshire within the next 2 years. These first 1,000 will lay the groundwork for a planned wave of 19,000 other liberty lovers.

The press release follows…

The national movement to recruit pro-liberty, small government activists to move to New Hampshire to concentrate their political efforts declared success this week in recruiting its first 1000 early-moving “pioneers.”

The Free State Project (FSP) ran an almost yearlong campaign to sign up 1000 people to move early to the chosen state of New Hampshire while the Project continues to recruit for its ultimate goal of 20,000 participants. Those who sign up for the Project agree to move once all 20,000 have committed (currently, more than 7500 have signed up). But these “First 1000” have agreed to move within two years, regardless of when the others are recruited.

The purpose of the First 1000 campaign is to get more people on the ground earlier to effect early successes, to gain more attention for recruitment purposes, and to blaze the trail for the other 19,000 to follow. There are more than 170 early movers and 300 native Granite Staters already in New Hampshire.

Here is just a small sample of their significant successes:

An early mover was elected in November to the New Hampshire State House. Libertarians and other Free Staters hold about 30 public offices in the state.
Free Staters chair New Hampshire’s Republican Liberty Caucus, Democratic Freedom Caucus, and Libertarian Party.

A Free Stater proposed and got legislation passed in 2006 ending the requirement for “state approval” of home schoolers’ curricula.

Free Staters were a critical force in helping to defeat a statewide smoking ban, as well as a pilot program for a national ID card.

These successes have caught the attention of the national media, with TIME magazine saying in a November article, “They [FSP participants] could finally make a difference and show the rest of America what real liberty looks like – the kind where you don’t have to wear seat belts or register your guns and nobody passes laws about what the neighbors can do in their bedroom.”

FSP participants will work within New Hampshire’s political system to reduce taxes and regulation and expand individual rights and free markets. Some will run for public office while others will use the tools of lobbying, civil disobedience, protests, or other peaceful means to affect political change. The state was chosen because of its small population and more freedomoriented culture.

“As Americans become more frustrated with expanding government at all levels – deficit spending, rising taxes, eminent domain abuse, invasions of privacy – and as both major parties seem focused on taking power away from the people and giving it to the state, we are looking for a way to reverse the trend. The Free State Project is a way like never before to focus our reforms in one place where we can have great success, and demonstrate that success to the rest of the country,” said Ian Bernard, radio talk show host and sponsor of the First 1000 campaign.

Signers from across the country will be gathering February 22-25 in Concord, NH, for the FSP’s New Hampshire Liberty Forum. The Forum is a chance for signers to learn about the state, as well as political action. Featured speakers will include likely Presidential candidate Congressman Ron Paul and libertarian and co-anchor of ABC’s 20/20, John Stossel.

Free Staters are being welcomed by several groups, including the Coalition of New Hampshire Taxpayers, the Republican Liberty Caucus, the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance, the Libertarian Party of New Hampshire, and several Statehouse representatives and a former governor.

20 Responses to “FSP Hits 1,000 “Early Movers””

  1. Sean Scallon Says:

    And all these people can become Ron Paul activists for the New Hampshire primary.

    That will do wonders for the FSP’s membership if Paul can win

  2. George Whitfield Says:

    I may move to New Hampshire eventually.

  3. Seth Says:

    Sean: The primary will happen in late 2007, or very very early 2008… not all of those 1000 folks will have moved yet. Plus, not all of our activists get into politics in the first place, some prefer non-political civil disobediance actions instead(google Russell Kanning or see nhfree.com for example).

    That said, yes, there are going to be plenty of pro-Paul folks to help.

    George, move ASAP, you’re missing out on the fun.

  4. torah Says:

    Some say the FSP leadership paid folks to sign that pledge.

  5. Anthony Distler Says:

    I don’t understand this. A group of people are gathering to move to New Hampshire just for the political system? Man, that is a group of dedicated people right there.

    Me? I’ll just stick around with Pennsylvania politics.

  6. Seth Cohn Says:

    Torah: false rumor. Didn’t happen. At the very end, some people were paid to make phone calls, and some paid mailings went out, but NO ONE was paid to sign, and in fact, some (50+?) false signers (phony emails, etc) were removed right toward the end, to ensure that we had 1000 real people signed up.

  7. Cody Quirk Says:

    Hmmmm,

    I wonder if we, or I, should start a CSP (Constitutionalist State Project).

  8. torah Says:

    Cody, don’t you Constitution Partyers have that out in South Carolina? Project exodus it was called?

  9. Cody Quirk Says:

    =Christian Exodus.

    -Nope, doesn’t relate to the CP at all, though they do sympatheize with the Party.
    My opinion was we should move to a state and turn it into the model government that our founding fathers invisioned. Christian Exodus seeks to turn SC govenment into a Christian-oriented one, perhaps into a theocracy?

    But I wouldn’t be suprised if some of the CP’ers support it. Especially in the South.

  10. Cody Quirk Says:

    -Although I think they may have distanced themselves from the CP after the Tampa meeting, I’m not sure.

  11. RWR Says:

    I think it is wise for Christian Exodus to operate independently from any political party, although they still clearly state on their website that they are happy to work with members of the CP and share many of their principles. If Tampa changed that, then they haven’t said so that I can tell.

    CQ: “Christian Exodus seeks to turn SC govenment into a Christian-oriented one, perhaps into a theocracy?”

    If you mean ecclesiocracy, which people often do when they say theocracy, then CE is very adamant that they do not seek that. Freedom of all South Carolinians to practice or not practice Christianity is one of their expressed values. If you literally mean theocracy – God rules – then I would argue that an omnipotent God either does or doesn’t rule, regardless of the form of government.

    Congratulations to the FSP for reaching that landmark, and to CE for being on its way to doing the same. I think both are fine ideas.

  12. Cody Quirk Says:

    I think it is wise for Christian Exodus to operate independently from any political party, although they still clearly state on their website that they are happy to work with members of the CP and share many of their principles. If Tampa changed that, then they haven’t said so that I can tell.

    =Agreed.

    If you mean ecclesiocracy, which people often do when they say theocracy, then CE is very adamant that they do not seek that. Freedom of all South Carolinians to practice or not practice Christianity is one of their expressed values. If you literally mean theocracy – God rules – then I would argue that an omnipotent God either does or doesn’t rule, regardless of the form of government.

    =Actually I think you’re right, they don’t look as extreme as TAV, neither do they sound the same in their language. But I don’t know what they think, so I’m not jumping to conclusions on this.

  13. Trent Hill Says:

    Christian Exodus will probably be largely maginalized though, due to the large population of South Carolina. While South Carolina is a VERY conservative state, im not sure the influx of “christian immigrants” will make any difference. They would need more than 20,000 to positively affect elections.

  14. Cody Quirk Says:

    Good luck, FSP.

  15. matt Says:

    If anyone in central Ohio is interested in starting an eccleisiocracy, just call me. I’ll personally help you pack your bags for South Carolina. I can come on short notice and even bring my own masking tape and bubble wrap. Also, it would be nice if you’d help repeal those stupid sunday liquor laws before you go.

    All of this is said in the Spirit of Christian Love…

  16. Trent Hill Says:

    LOL. Nice Matt.

  17. Andy Says:

    “matt Says:

    January 25th, 2007 at 12:08 pm
    If anyone in central Ohio is interested in starting an eccleisiocracy, just call me. I’ll personally help you pack your bags for South Carolina.”

    Just don’t send them to Myrtle Beach. Those party poopers will take away stuff that makes that town fun.

  18. Trent Hill Says:

    NO MORE WEARING SHORTS! ANKLES ARE IN THE NAUGHTY ZONE!

    lol.

  19. matt Says:

    Speaking of modest ankles, isn’t Bob Jones University in SC?

    It seems like there’s some good looking Baptist girls walking around this country, but that’s just an educated guess. No way to find out for sure.

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