45,480 Independent Americans

Report from IAP State Chairman, Christopher H. Hansen

The newest Secretary of State report is out and the Independent American Party of Nevada now has 45,480 registered members in the IAP!

To see the Secretary of State Web site to prove these numbers just Click Here.

That is 1,531 new Independent Americans since October 31st of 2006 AD.

That is 306 new Independent Americans a month!

But that is NOTHING compared to this NEWS! Stand up all you Independent Americans and shout our praises to, in the words of Thomas Jefferson:

“...that Being in whose hands we are, who led our fathers, as Israel of old, from their native land and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries and comforts of life; who has covered our infancy with His providence and our riper years with His wisdom and power, and to whose goodness I ask you to join in supplications with me that He will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils, and prosper their measures that whatsoever they do shall result in your good, and shall secure to you the peace, friendship, and approbation of all nations.”

Between October 31, 2006 AD and March 31, 2007 AD the

Over all voter registration lost 29,581

The Democrats lost 12,009

The Republicans lost 11,699

The Non-partisans lost 7,194

The Libertarians lost 82

The Greens lost 48

The Natural Laws lost 82

The Independent Americans gained 1,531

57 Responses to “45,480 Independent Americans”

  1. Austin Cassidy Says:

    Wow, those are some nice numbers for the IAP!

  2. Cody Quirk Says:

    Damn straight!

  3. Rob Says:

    Seriously, this is stupid. The “Independent American Party” only got around 1000 votes for President in 2004, yet they had over 40,000 registered voters at the time. The Libertarians got over three times the number of votes that year, yet they had far, far fewer registered voters.

    Are you saying that the Constitution Party can only capture 2.5% of their base?

    Obviously, people think they’re registering as “Independents” instead of with an actual party. Same problem occurs in California, which is why over 90% of all so-called Constitution Party “registered voters” are located in just those two states.

    I guarantee you if the party was labeled as “Constitution Party” in those two states their registered voter numbers would be much smaller.

  4. Trent Hill Says:

    Rob,that doesnt explain why the candidate for Secretary of State got 38,757 votes does it?

    And no, 90% of people don’t think they’re registered Independant. The CP had 385k registered voters in 2004, and receieved 142k votes for President. More than a 1/3rd turnout for the Presidential race isn’t bad (for third parties).

  5. Trent Hill Says:

    Also,why did the Nevada IAP from 1992-2002 have between 1000-3000 people,and then BOOM to 45,000?

  6. Tom Bryant Says:

    It is very funny to see CPers play pretend in their own little world.

    Why can’t the CP experience such huge registered numbers in states where they are called the “Constitution Party”? Why do they only have high voter registration numbers in states where they their name begins with “Independent”?

    Hmmmmm

  7. Trent Hill Says:

    Because Nevada has 3 or 4 people who, their full time job, is to promote the CP. Janine Hansen is a professional lobbier. Chris Hansen has a job, but makes this a VERY high priority. Their entire family, plus hundreds of other dedicated activists are pushing that party.
    The same thing doesnt apply to California, Minnesota, or Florida.

    you didnt answer the questions.
    “that doesnt explain why the candidate for Secretary of State got 38,757 votes does it?”
    “Also,why did the Nevada IAP from 1992-2002 have between 1000-3000 people,and then BOOM to 45,000?”

    Answer.

  8. Sean Scallon Says:

    Given all these registered IAP voters, it would take only a few thousand to switch their registration for a year to the GOP and vote in the Nevada GOP caucus on Jan. 14 for Ron Paul. A victory for Paul in the caucus would greatyly enhance his credibility and with the Nevada GOP currrently is disarray and few of the other candidates paying attention to it, the caucus is ripe for the taking. I’ve tried to convince Chris Hansen to ask some of the registered IAP people to do this but have failed. Perhaps someone on TPW can do a better job of making Chris see the opportunity for haveing a real impact on the presidential election in 2008 rather than the same old-same old.

  9. timothy west Says:

    Make sure you tell everyone that Jefferson was not a Christian. In todays terminology, he would be at best a universal unitarian, or in his day, a Deist.

    Sorry, but if the ballot line for the IAP contains the word “INDEPENDENT” in any manner then the numbers of actual Independent voters have to be factored in. If the true independent ballot line says something like “decline to state/no party” then I might buy it.

  10. Rob Says:

    Trent,

    You misunderstood me greatly. I didn’t say that 90% of people thought they were registering independent, I said over 90% of all the Constitution Party’s registered voters come from states where there’s “Independent” in their party label.

    Look at the Nov. ‘06 registration totals provided by Ballot Access News. Nationwide, the CP supposedly has 366,937 registered voters. Yet 349,609 of those (95% of the total) come just two states, where the CP just happens to be labeled “Independent American”. Coincidence? Um, no.

    Take out NV and CA, and the national CP’s registration numbers are even smaller than the single-state Alaskan Independence Party.

    I’m using 11/06 numbers here, but I’m sure the argument doesn’t change much with updated numbers. The CP’s totals would be just about nowhere without the use of “Independent” in their label.

    Oh, and I could even take this a small step furthur: Nebraska. In that state, the CP isn’t labeled CP but rather the Nebraska Party. The result shouldn’t be a surprise: of the 17,328 registered voters the CP claims that aren’t in NV or CA, a full 7152 of those come from just one small state – Nebraska.

    Yep, say it with me…OUCH.

    Bottom line: if the CP was properly labeled as “Constitution Party” in all the states, their registration totals would be a tiny fraction of the current numbers they so proudly claim.

  11. Ghoststrider Says:

    Ah, looks like the CP once again pretends that people are actually voting for them. Rob is right—the CP is a joke. Take out the IAP and the Neb Party and they have nearly nothing. Hmm, I wonder if that would be considered fradulent advertising?

  12. Jackcjackson Says:

    Everyone knows people who register today are much more likely to register “Independent” than they were 10-20 years ago, and people are switching from DEm and Rep to Ind. Apparently people think they are registering as Independent.

    Someone should start the “Decline to Affiliate” Party or similar and then brag about their registrations.

  13. Cody Quirk Says:

    You misunderstood me greatly. I didn’t say that 90% of people thought they were registering independent, I said over 90% of all the Constitution Party’s registered voters come from states where there’s “Independent” in their party label.

    =Yeah so?! It means that the CP needs to change it’s name then.

    Look at the Nov. ‘06 registration totals provided by Ballot Access News. Nationwide, the CP supposedly has 366,937 registered voters. Yet 349,609 of those (95% of the total) come just two states, where the CP just happens to be labeled “Independent American”. Coincidence? Um, no.

    =Yeah so?! Also remember that the Parties with ‘Independent’ in their title have also been around much, much longer then the Constitution Party itself.

    Take out NV and CA, and the national CP’s registration numbers are even smaller than the single-state Alaskan Independence Party.

    =Which only shows that the other parties need some catching up to do with us and also that the national CP needs to look at changing their name to sound more appealing.

    I’m using 11/06 numbers here, but I’m sure the argument doesn’t change much with updated numbers. The CP’s totals would be just about nowhere without the use of “Independent” in their label.

    =Perhaps the CP could do better nationwide with ‘Independent’ in their national label, and in the other states too?

    Oh, and I could even take this a small step furthur: Nebraska. In that state, the CP isn’t labeled CP but rather the Nebraska Party. The result shouldn’t be a surprise: of the 17,328 registered voters the CP claims that aren’t in NV or CA, a full 7152 of those come from just one small state – Nebraska.

    =They’re now trying to change their name to ‘Nebraska Independent Party’ now, but it’s in court presently, since the fascist Republicans don’t want their political clout hurt.

    Yep, say it with me…OUCH.

    =Actually what really hurts is the fact that not only do IAP registered voters register IAP, they even vote IAP too! Look at the examples of Janine Hansen in the November Elections, or Joel Hansen back in 2004!
    Even Johnathan Hansen got 81,000 votes for Clark County Assessor. And that was only in Clark County!

    =OUCH!

    Bottom line: if the CP was properly labeled as “Constitution Party” in all the states, their registration totals would be a tiny fraction of the current numbers they so proudly claim.

    =I do agree with that, yet the CP is a coalition of different state parties and not a single organ. So each state should be allowed to call itself ‘Independent’ or whatever. I would oppose any attempts to make all states adopt the CP name.

    =However then again, you have Utah as a contridiction to that. The Utah CP competed with the Utah IAP (no relation to the Nevada Party), to get on the ballot, and Utahns decided to register Constitution Party over the IAP in that state.

  14. Cody Quirk Says:

    Ah, looks like the CP once again pretends that people are actually voting for them. Rob is right—the CP is a joke. Take out the IAP and the Neb Party and they have nearly nothing. Hmm, I wonder if that would be considered fradulent advertising?

    =Then why are more Nevada voters voting for “fradulent advertising”? Especially when it comes to Joel running for State Supreme Court, or yet Johnathan running for Clark County Assessor? Such candidates got MORE votes then the number of Nevadans registered IAP!

    =Even Janine runing for Secratary of State came within a few thousand votes of getting more then 45,000 statewide, in fact, if two more people in Eureka County voted for her, she would have garnered more votes then the Democratic candidate.

    =Don’t forget the two IAP’ers elected to office last year, and another one in 2004. The two recently elected were in partisan races too. One was even running against a GOP’er and a Libertarian!

  15. Cody Quirk Says:

    Someone should start the “Decline to Affiliate” Party or similar and then brag about their registrations.

    =Maybe if people actually vote ‘Decline to Affiliate’ in large numbers like IAP voters do. Then you can brag about it and have the merits to do so.

  16. Cody Quirk Says:

    Why can’t the CP experience such huge registered numbers in states where they are called the “Constitution Party”? Why do they only have high voter registration numbers in states where they their name begins with “Independent”?

    =Obviously you don’t understand third-party history.

  17. Trent Hill Says:

    The difference between California and Nevada is that California benefits from the Independant labelling significantly more than Nevada does. the Nevada IAP has been called the IAP since 1992. But only in 2002 did the numbers really start exploding.

    Besides, this still doesnt explain why Janine Hansen got over 38,000 votes for Secretary of State. Why? Because people liked what she said. Not because they thought she was an independant.

    As for your statistics…they dont REALLY matter. The Governor/Senator candidates for the AIP of California regularly get 70,000-125,000 votes.
    You will probably mention that in PRESIDENTIAL votes they get only 25,30k votes. Well, the LP fares similarly—getting only 50k votes in the Presidential votes after scoring 115k for the Gubanatorial race. Presidential races turnout lower. THEY JUST DO.
    I would guess that both California and Nevada suffer from Independant syndrome—mostly California. 350,000 registered IAP/AIP voters in CA/NV. But they only turn in about 105,000 votes for top offices (combined). Your assertion that people only vote for them because they are independant doesnt really make sense—there is almost ALWAYS a more high-profile independant candidate (usually like 12). So why would those people vote for a low-profile party rather than a high-profile independant? It doesnt make sense.

    As for Nebraska…what does that have to do with anything? Are you saying people that register/vote for the Nebraska Party think they are independant too? How is this any different from the America First Party?
    No, the fact is that Nevada and Nebraska are areas where our message resonates, the Republican are liberal, and the leaders are able.

  18. Rob Says:

    Try to put aside the local elections for a minute and focus on a constant across all states, like the presidental race. It might help you think this thru a little more logically.

    For example, take the Peroutka campaign. In states where the CP is labeled as Independent, he only captured a tiny percentage (around 3% in NV) of so-called CP registered voters. In California, the percentage was something like 6%.

    Can you imagine Bush only getting 3-6% of the Republican vote? Of course not.

    Now, look at states where the CP is properly labeled, like PA and OR. In those states, the CP got more votes for president then the number of CP registered voters. That makes more sense.

    Let me know if you need more help understanding this.

  19. Rob Says:

    (my response was to Cody, btw)

    Good response from Trent, tho.

    The bottom line here still stands: The CP’s voter registration totals would be significantly reduced if they weren’t labeled as some sort of “Independent” Party.

  20. Tom Bryant Says:

    Janine’s message resonated so well that she managed to raise a whoppin’ $0 (that’s right zero, not a single penny) for her campaign.

    Amazing that the CPers think it was Janine’s campaign and message that got her those votes, and had nothing to do with her being a protest candidate.

    Guys…it is very common for third parties to get more votes then their membership. In Michigan, we get nearly 20 times as many votes as we have members.

    Chris Hansen isn’t a great leader, he’s a whacked out conspiracy theorist tile layer who gets himself involved in way too many tax-evasion schemes.

  21. Cody Quirk Says:

    “Now, look at states where the CP is properly labeled, like PA and OR. In those states, the CP got more votes for president then the number of CP registered voters. That makes more sense.”

    =Thanks to campaigning and organizing. Yet the CP Presidential candidate still got the most votes in California. And did very well in Alaksa, under the AKIP label.

    Like Trent said, people are more passionate on Presidential elections, not in Gubernatorial or State Legislative Elections. People conform most to the two-party system when it comes to the Presidential race.

    An example would be Jesse Ventura being elected Governor in Minnesota while that state still votes overwhelmingly Democratic to this day.

    Even in states where the Party has little organization, does the CP message strike a cord with disguntled conservatives.

    Makes sense to me.

    Though some Nevada IAP’ers did have qualms with Peroutka and didn’t vote for him, even before Peroutka expressed his true colors around the Tampa meeting. Chris’s wife didn’t vote for him at all, despite being registered IAP herself.

  22. Cody Quirk Says:

    The bottom line here still stands: The CP’s voter registration totals would be significantly reduced if they weren’t labeled as some sort of “Independent” Party.

    =I agree that would be the case in most states. Not in Utah, however. Remember not all state voters think alike.

  23. Cody Quirk Says:

    Janine’s message resonated so well that she managed to raise a whoppin’ $0 (that’s right zero, not a single penny) for her campaign.

    =Yet she got all those votes and the highest % of all the IAP state-wide candidates. Tells you something!

    Amazing that the CPers think it was Janine’s campaign and message that got her those votes, and had nothing to do with her being a protest candidate.

    =Janine got way less publicity then Chris, yet she got more votes then him. Just shows that Nevadans don’t simply vote IAP because of the ‘Independent’ name.

    Guys…it is very common for third parties to get more votes then their membership. In Michigan, we get nearly 20 times as many votes as we have members.

    =Der!

    Chris Hansen isn’t a great leader, he’s a whacked out conspiracy theorist tile layer who gets himself involved in way too many tax-evasion schemes.

    =Yeah, a wacked out leader that wins the majority of his court cases, knows law like the back of his hand and has grown the IAP and gotten it major media coverage since his becoming State Chair. And has gotten more IAP’ers elected to office then ever before in IAP history. Some accomplishments for a conspiracy theorist indeed!

  24. Chris Fluharty Says:

    Trent, Cody they are just Jealous because we are getting people elected in state and local offices. Do not waste time proving the obvious.

  25. Tom Bryant Says:

    When you guys can reproduce those numbers with the name “Constitution Party” you’ll be on to something.

  26. Chris Fluharty Says:

    Fact is Tom some of the states with the CP name do not have party regerstraion. As is the case here in Missouri. We have open primaries. So that is a useless litmus test. The real results are the elected officials. We have state reps and such elected. We are on to something.

  27. Trent Hill Says:

    True. How exactly do you explain Rick Jore?

  28. Andy Says:

    “Rob Says:

    May 31st, 2007 at 1:04 pm
    Trent,

    You misunderstood me greatly. I didn’t say that 90% of people thought they were registering independent, I said over 90% of all the Constitution Party’s registered voters come from states where there’s “Independent” in their party label.

    Look at the Nov. ‘06 registration totals provided by Ballot Access News. Nationwide, the CP supposedly has 366,937 registered voters. Yet 349,609 of those (95% of the total) come just two states, where the CP just happens to be labeled “Independent American”. Coincidence? Um, no.

    Take out NV and CA, and the national CP’s registration numbers are even smaller than the single-state Alaskan Independence Party.

    I’m using 11/06 numbers here, but I’m sure the argument doesn’t change much with updated numbers. The CP’s totals would be just about nowhere without the use of “Independent” in their label.”

    I’ve said this here before, but now I’ll say it again. I’ve done a LOT of voter registration and petitioning in California. I’ve registered SEVERAL THOUSAND people to vote in that state. I NEVER ran into one person who registered with the American Independent Party on purpose. Everyone who did this did it thinking that they were registering with as an independent – as in having no political party. To do this in California one is supposed to check the Decline To State A Political Party box. When I told people what the American Independent Party was (and I did NOT say it in a negative way) some of them requested another form so they could check the Decline To State A Political Party box, and others said, “Screw it, I’m in a hurry.”

    I also worked on a campaign in Nevada for a few weeks in 2004. This coincided with the 2004 election. I talked to several thousand people in Nevada and not one person identified themselves as being a member of or even just a supporter of the Independent American Party. I ran in to many people who identified themselves as Democrats and Republicans. I even ran into a few people who identified themselves as Libertarians and Greens, but not one person identified themselves with the Independent American Party.

    “Oh, and I could even take this a small step furthur: Nebraska. In that state, the CP isn’t labeled CP but rather the Nebraska Party. The result shouldn’t be a surprise: of the 17,328 registered voters the CP claims that aren’t in NV or CA, a full 7152 of those come from just one small state – Nebraska.”

    I’ve also done petitioning and voter registration in Nebraska. I haven’t registered as many people to vote in Nebraska as I have in California, but I did register several hundred people to vote in Nebraska. I didn’t have many people check the Nebraska Party box, but out of those who did none of them knew what the Nebraska Party was. I know this because I asked them. They were like, “I’m from Nebraska so I’ll pick this one.”, or “I like Nebraska football.” or something like that. The few people that I encountered who knew who the Nebraska Party were refered to them as “a bunch of whackos.”

    “Yep, say it with me…OUCH.

    Bottom line: if the CP was properly labeled as ‘Constitution Party’ in all the states, their registration totals would be a tiny fraction of the current numbers they so proudly claim.”

    Sad but true. You’d think that more people would be interested in a party that’s named after the Constitution. However, it seems that the party only gets lots of registrations when they’ve got something vague in their name like “Independent” or “Nebraska.”

    I’m not saying any of this to be rude. I’m just repeating my real life, on the ground expierences in these states. As I’ve said on here before, I actually like the Constitution Party as I agree with them on a lot of issues and I consider them to be my 2nd favorite political party (the Libertarian Party is still #1 with me).

  29. Andy Says:

    “Jackcjackson Says:

    May 31st, 2007 at 2:12 pm
    Everyone knows people who register today are much more likely to register “Independent” than they were 10-20 years ago, and people are switching from DEm and Rep to Ind. Apparently people think they are registering as Independent.

    Someone should start the “Decline to Affiliate” Party or similar and then brag about their registrations.”

    This is true. I’ve registered thousands of people to vote in several states over the past 7 years. In the states I’ve registed people in that have partisan voter registration – that is where people can chose to register under a party banner – the largest percentage of people chose to register as independents, as in no political party affiliation.

  30. Trent Hill Says:

    Ohk…how exactly is it that people in Nebraska dont know what the Nebraska Party stands for? The name makes it pretty obvious that it is a “Nbraska first” kind of party. As for people only registering in it because, “Im from Nebraska” or because it is vague…
    Take a look at the majority of Democratic or Republican voters, they are in it cuz their parents were—-and a vague platform for each candidate.

  31. Tom Bryant Says:

    Chris,

    I’m not trying to bash the CP and its successes, I’m just pointing out that the registration numbers are misleading because of the name “Independent”. A lot of states that have registration have an option of “Independent.” This is a common term used to describe people that are not affiliated with a political party. The fact that the two states with highest registration just happen to call themselves “Independent…” instead of “Constitution Party” is not just a coincedence. That the CP folks cannot even fathom that people have made a mistake seems to indicate a lot about their motives (and why they aren’t making an effort to standardize their party name in those states).

    The CP has elected one state rep as far as I know. If the Montana CP can elect a state rep, with a lot less support, why can’t Nevada and California do so?

    If Nevada really has some great programs to get people to register with them, why can’t that program be reproduced in other states? Is it really believable that the Nevada IAP has some wonderful program to increase voter registration when it doesn’t raise any money to speak of? Where is the evidence of this program in action – where are the TV ads, where are the radio ads, where are the newspaper ads, where are the leaflets, etc?

    There’s no money in the Nevada IAP, and there’s no evidence of a massive state-wide recruiting drive.

    The simplest explaination seems to be confusion on the part of those registering.

    Again, if the CP can reproduce these results under the name “Constitution Party” or even “U.S. Taxpayers” I’ll believe their claims.

  32. Tom Bryant Says:

    Let’s look at some numbers in the 2006 election, and see the voter results vs registered for third party candidates. I’ll use the two biggest counties

    Clark County:
    Registered IAP - 23,555
    Registered LP - 3751
    Registered Green – 1566

    US Senate results:
    IAP: 3834 (16% of registered)
    LP: 3289 (88% of registered)

    Governor:
    IAP: 11810 (50% of registered)
    Green: 3854 (246% of registered)

    Washoe county:
    Registered IAP: 6782
    Registered LP: 1513
    Registered Green: 1039

    US Senate:
    IAP: 1627 (24% of registered)
    LP: 1133 (75% of registered)

    Governor:
    IAP: 3666 (55% of registered)
    Green: 1786 (172% of registered)

    Now, the CP makes a big fuss that Janine Hansen got MORE votes than the number of registered voters. This happens quite frequently for the Greens.
    The Libertarians got about 8000 votes for Congressional Representatives in Clark County when they only have 6289 registered voters (and they only ran in 2 of the 3 districts).

    There is nothing special about getting more votes than registered voters (the IAP, Greens, and Libertarians all did that in 2006). There is something special about the IAP getting such abyssmally low percentages of votes to registered voters though.

    If the IAP really does have all these legitimate registered voters, then they need to brush up on how to mobilize them to get to the polls. They should take lessons from the Greens, who regularly experience getting more votes than they have registered in Nevada.

  33. Cody Quirk Says:

    The CP has elected one state rep as far as I know. If the Montana CP can elect a state rep, with a lot less support, why can’t Nevada and California do so?

    =The Nevada IAP has 3 people serving in local offices. In the legislative races the candidates get usually 20 to 30% of the votes, that may change, there’ll be a IAP in the legislature soon.

    I’ve said this here before, but now I’ll say it again. I’ve done a LOT of voter registration and petitioning in California. I’ve registered SEVERAL THOUSAND people to vote in that state. I NEVER ran into one person who registered with the American Independent Party on purpose. Everyone who did this did it thinking that they were registering with as an independent – as in having no political party. To do this in California one is supposed to check the Decline To State A Political Party box. When I told people what the American Independent Party was (and I did NOT say it in a negative way) some of them requested another form so they could check the Decline To State A Political Party box, and others said, “Screw it, I’m in a hurry.”

    =I concede that’s the story in California, but it isn’t in Nevada. Nevada is different. MUCH different.

  34. Andy Says:

    “Trent Hill Says:
    June 1st, 2007 at 9:34 am
    Ohk…how exactly is it that people in Nebraska dont know what the Nebraska Party stands for? The name makes it pretty obvious that it is a ‘Nbraska first’ kind of party.”

    Because a lot of people are ignorant and they are too lazy to do their homework when it comes to politics.

    It sounds to me like you’d be suprised about how many ignorant people there are and just how ignorant some of them are. For instance, I one ran into a women who asked me (seriously) if George W. Bush was a member of the Green Party. I’ve run into people who don’t know who Ralph Nader and Pat Buchanan are. I’ve run into people who thought that Ross Perot and/or Ralph Nader and/or Pat Buchanan and/or Lyndon Larouche are members of the Libertarian Party. I’ve run into people who thought that the Libertarian Party was communist. I’ve run into people who don’t know that Dick Cheney is the Vice President. I’ve run into people who don’t know the difference between local, state, and federal government.

    “Take a look at the majority of Democratic or Republican voters, they are in it cuz their parents were—-and a vague platform for each candidate.”

    You are right about this. Most Democrats and Republicans don’t have any real reasons that they are Democrats or Republicans. They are often times just Democrats or Republicans because that’s what their family is or because of their union or because of some other group to which they belong. There is no real thought, it’s just a group think mentality.

    The Democrats and Republican can get away with this because they have lots of money backing them up. If anything, the Democrats and Republicans actually prefer that their supporters remain ignorant. Why? Because if they become too informed they may lose them as supporters.

    I once saw a t-shirt that said, “We are a nation of sheep ruled by pigs.” I’d say that this statement is basically true.

  35. Cody Quirk Says:

    Now, the CP makes a big fuss that Janine Hansen got MORE votes than the number of registered voters. This happens quite frequently for the Greens.
    The Libertarians got about 8000 votes for Congressional Representatives in Clark County when they only have 6289 registered voters (and they only ran in 2 of the 3 districts).

    =I didn’t say that about Janine- she almost got as many votes as there are registered IAP’ers, not more- Hello?!

    Yet let’s look at more numbers in Clark County, shall we?-

    (excluding the major party candidates)-

    US Senate-

    SCHUMANN, DAVID K. IAP 1.07% 3,848
    TRAINOR, BRENDAN LIB 0.91% 3,289

    &

    Congressional District 3

    HANSEN, JOSHUA IAP 2.53% 5,329
    SILVESTRI, JOSEPH P. LIB 2.44% 5,157
    ———————————-

    Okay, now lets take a look at the major party candidates and their votes, conpaired to Clark County’s GOP and Dem voter registration for October last year….

    For 2006 US Senate, GOP’er John Ensign got 188,847 votes in all of Clark county, yet there were 300,061 registered GOP’ers in that same county alone.

    Democrat Jack Carter got 159,214 votes in Clark County alone, yet there was 360,816 registered Democrats in that County then!

    Ok, now we go to the other major Party congressional candidates…..

    in Cong. District 1, you had 123,665 registered Democrats, yet the Dem candidate for the House got only 85,025 votes in the 2006 race.
    Hmmmmm!

    Now there was 84,196 registered GOP’ers in the same District, yet the Republican candidate got only 40,917 votes in the same race!

    We go to Cong. District 3 and there previously was 148,497 Democrats and 146,590 Republicans- yet the Dem. candidate last year got only 98,261 and the GOP candidate got 102,232 votes

    Why it seems that even the major parties also have a simliar problem with not getting as many votes as there are registered people to each party.

    Now we go back to third party candidates-

    In the State Senate (for Clark County)-

    IAP candidate Warren Markowitz got 18,312 votes, yet there are only 3,644 IAP’ers in his Senate District alone.

    IAP candidate Mary Boyer Martinez got 13,739 votes, yet there are only 2,608 IAP’ers in her District alone.

    On to the State Assembly….

    IAP candidate Stan Vaughan- 2,803 votes, yet there are only 568 IAP’ers in his District.

    IAP’er Glen Brown got- 1,538 votes, yet only 543 IAP’ers reside in that same District.

    IAP’er Steven Dempsey got- 2,026 votes, yet only 604 IAP’ers reside in Steve’s District.
    ————-

    Now we go to local races…

    For Clark County Assessor, IAP’er Johnathan Hansen got 81,401 votes

    For Clark County Treasurer, IAP’er Lance Hinton got 79,490 votes

    I rest my case.

  36. Cody Quirk Says:

    You know, the Nevada Libertarians really need to get their act together and stop the exodus of their registered voters and even candidates.

    And I will reveal the secret behind the success of the IAP. It is….

    THE HANSENS!

  37. Tom Bryant Says:

    Cody,

    The Nevada IAP gets 20-30s% in two-way races. That’s normal for third parties, and doesn’t indicate anything special about the Nevada IAP. For example, the Libertarian got 24% in the 2-way race in Assembly 16. When the IAP gets into a 3-way race, it’s vote totals are 4-6%. The Libertarian Party gets around the same percent when it’s in a 3-way race as well (State Assembly 13).

    Don’t take this the wrong way, the CP is doing very well for a third party. It’s really tough to get a state rep elected, and its great you guys pulled this off. But I think that your ability to analyze election results is still in its youth. What you see in Nevada is the norm with third parties. The 2-way races where you get 20-30% of the vote isn’t support for YOUR candidate, it’s opposition to the major party candidate running. If a Democrat and IAP candidate are running in a Democratic district (why the GOP didn’t run a candidate), the IAP will get all the GOP votes.

  38. Cody Quirk Says:

    The Nevada IAP gets 20-30s% in two-way races. That’s normal for third parties, and doesn’t indicate anything special about the Nevada IAP. For example, the Libertarian got 24% in the 2-way race in Assembly 16.

    =Very good, though you probably had IAP’ers in that District voting for the Libertarian too. However IAP’ers still get a higher precentage in those races.

    When the IAP gets into a 3-way race, it’s vote totals are 4-6%. The Libertarian Party gets around the same percent when it’s in a 3-way race as well (State Assembly 13).

    =Yes, but not in all cases.

    Don’t take this the wrong way, the CP is doing very well for a third party. It’s really tough to get a state rep elected, and its great you guys pulled this off.

    =Thank you.

    But I think that your ability to analyze election results is still in its youth. What you see in Nevada is the norm with third parties. The 2-way races where you get 20-30% of the vote isn’t support for YOUR candidate, it’s opposition to the major party candidate running.

    =Yet the question then would be why doesn’t that other major Party, or the other parties run a candidate in those Districts?

    If a Democrat and IAP candidate are running in a Democratic district (why the GOP didn’t run a candidate), the IAP will get all the GOP votes.

    =Exactely, which shows that GOP’ers are gravitatiting more towards the Independent American Party!

  39. Tom Bryant Says:

    Cody,

    The major party candidates sometimes don’t run candidates in districts that they know they cannot win. That doesnt mean IAP candidates are attracting GOP voters based on their views, it just means that a Republican will vote for anyone other than a Democrat, and a Democrat will vote for anyone other than a Republican. This has nothing to do with the popularity of the third party. You’ll notice that there are no 30% totals for a third party candidate in a 3 way race. If what you assert is true, then it shouldn’t matter how many are in the race.

    Look at State Senate district 9. Do you really think that Democrats are flocking to the IAP? In 2002, when it was a 3 way race, the IAP candidate got 3.14% and the Democratic candidate got 42%. In 2004 and 2006, no Democrat ran. If a Democrat ran in 2008, you think that the IAP candidate will get 30% in that race?

    Every third party does better in 2 way races than 3 way races. That it has everything to do with the number of opponents and nothing to do with the level of support.

  40. Andy Says:

    “If a Democrat and IAP candidate are running in a Democratic district (why the GOP didn’t run a candidate), the IAP will get all the GOP votes.”

    This isn’t necessarily true. I’ve heard of cases where a lot of Republicans voted for a Democrat or left an office blank rather than vote for a minor party or independent candidate.

  41. Trent Hill Says:

    Cody, two way races definetly are more subjective to third party votes than 3 ways. Four ways are the best though.

  42. Cody Quirk Says:

    You’ll notice that there are no 30% totals for a third party candidate in a 3 way race.

    =Wrong, for Eureka County Treasurer, the IAP candidate got a majority of votes running against a GOP’er and a Libertarian. She got elected of course.

    Apparently Nevada is a fertile ground for a major IAP victory.

  43. Rob Says:

    Holy moly, you’re kidding, right? I mean, you’ve already demonstrated you’re on the naive side of analysing election results, but come on…

    You’re talking about Jackie Berg, who won this massive race with a whopping 389 votes??? Most local school board races are larger than that.

    And this leads to you to believe “Nevada is a fertile ground for a major IAP victory”?

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to see newbies get involved in third party politics and all, but you’ve got a seriously thick pair of rose-colored glasses on.

    Again, Peroutka got 1152 votes in a party that supposedly has 45,000 members. Put down your bullhorn for a second and tell me the obvious, number one reason for that huge discrepancy.

    (And this comes from someone who would actually vote for CP candidates if they could ever get on the ballot in my state)

  44. Trent Hill Says:

    Rob,

    I’d say there are are a number of reasons why the Presidential race garners only 1152 votes in Nevada. The smallest of which is confusion with the “Independant” word in the party name.

    A.)People are MUCH less likely to vote for Third-party presidential race. Period.
    B.)Because the STATE party name is different than the NATIONAL party name, people don’t put together 1 and 1. They see Michael Peroutka from the CP on TV, and then think “Well,there is no CP in our state. Only an IAP.”

  45. Andy Says:

    “B.)Because the STATE party name is different than the NATIONAL party name, people don’t put together 1 and 1. They see Michael Peroutka from the CP on TV, and then think ‘Well,there is no CP in our state. Only an IAP.’”

    Michael Peroutka was on TV?? I must have missed that. I remember seeing Howard Philips on TV a small handful of times during his runs, but I never saw Peroutka on TV.

  46. Andy Says:

    Oh, wait a minute. I take that back. I do remember seeing Peroutka on a PBS special about 3rd party candidates.

    In 2004 the Libertarian candidate Michael Badnarik didn’t recieve much TV coverage either, even by Libertarian standards.

    The only candidate outside of Bush & Kerry to get much TV coverage in 2004 was Nader.

  47. Cody Quirk Says:

    You’re talking about Jackie Berg, who won this massive race with a whopping 389 votes??? Most local school board races are larger than that.

    =Yet being a 3-way race, she still won with a majority of votes, and the IAP elected somebody to office running for the Elko School Board.

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to see newbies get involved in third party politics and all, but you’ve got a seriously thick pair of rose-colored glasses on.

    =I’ve been in politics for many years, I think you need to take your glasses off and read Trents comments….

    Better yet, I’ll say it for you.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    Now repeat after me….

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    Alright.

    And let’s remember the 8 other states where Peroutka got less votes then in Nevada too.

  48. Rob Says:

    What other state party does a presidential candidate only get about 2.5% of the number of registered voters of his own party?

  49. Rob Says:

    Oh, and your childish little rant there doesn’t hold water, at least in explaining away the point of this whole thread.

    Why did the LP candidate get triple the number of votes than the CP candidate, even though the LP has far fewer registered voters? If the same percentage of people of each party voted for their respected candidates, than Peroutka should have blown Badnarik out of the water. Badnarik was a crappy candidate who barely got any press whatsoever.

    I know you hate the real answer, but I’ll admit its been kinda funny watching you dance around the elephant in the room.

  50. Cody Quirk Says:

    What other state party does a presidential candidate only get about 2.5% of the number of registered voters of his own party?

    =Peroutka got less of a percentage in Minnesota, New Mexico, Delaware, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Tennessee, then in Nevada, which has a a smaller number of registered voters (and general population), then the named states. Don’t believe me? The numbers don’t lie here…

    http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/

    Oh, and your childish little rant there doesn’t hold water, at least in explaining away the point of this whole thread.

    =Neither does your smear attempts on the IAP, plus your explanation of the presidential race.

    Why did the LP candidate get triple the number of votes than the CP candidate, even though the LP has far fewer registered voters?

    =Badnarik was actually more active then Peroutka and also better funded.
    Oh yes, did I mention that Badnarik was on the ballot in more states then Peroutka?!

    If the same percentage of people of each party voted for their respected candidates, than Peroutka should have blown Badnarik out of the water.

    =Not necessarly. I personally think Badnarik had a wider appeal then Peroutka, and LP funding, plus he was on the ballot on most states duh! Badnarik tried to reach out to everybody while Peroutka was selective on who he reached out to and where he campaigned.

    Badnarik was a crappy candidate who barely got any press whatsoever.

    =No, he did get more publicity then Peroutka, and more funding, and he campaigned more.

    I know you hate the real answer, but I’ll admit its been kinda funny watching you dance around the elephant in the room.

    =It’s really funny how you try to come up with dumb questions and even more stupid answers.

  51. Rob Says:

    You completely missed the point.

    I said nowhere else but in NV did a presidential candidate do so poorly as too equal only 2.5% of the number of the registered voters of his own party.

    The number of CP registered voters in NM is only 60; in DE it’s 275; in NJ it’s 141; etc, etc. (Again, almost the entire CP registered voter base is located in the two states where it’s listed as IAP)

    Peroutka got WAY more votes than 2.5% of those numbers where he was on the ballot; often much more then 100%. Take a look at NJ, for example, where he got almost 3000 votes.

    I shouldn’t be surprised that you’re not grasping this; but hey, math isn’t for everyone.

  52. Cody Quirk Says:

    ‘I said nowhere else but in NV did a presidential candidate do so poorly as too equal only 2.5% of the number of the registered voters of his own party.’

    And I told you again and again=

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    *People are the most politically passionate about who will be president, so adherence to the two-party system is the strongest in presidential races.

    DER!

    Don’t you get it, or are you honestly retarded as you say you are.

    How do you explain the IAP statewide and local candidates getting a larger % of the vote the the Prez. candidate?

  53. Cody Quirk Says:

    BTW, even in the major parties, a candidate will get less votes then there are registered GOP’ers.

    Look at Barry Goldwater running in 64’, or Mondale in 84’.

  54. Rob Says:

    Um, could you tell me exactly why you brought up a state like CP’s NJ in comparing in to IAP’s NV?

    This should be good.

    And you’re actually bringing up Goldwater/Mondale campaigns? Are you suggesting they got close to 2.5% of their respective party’s votes?

  55. Cody Quirk Says:

    Um, could you tell me exactly why you brought up a state like CP’s NJ in comparing in to IAP’s NV?

    =In 2004 Peroutka got more votes in NJ then Nevada, but only added up to .98% of the vote, while in Nevada it was vice versa- he got .14% of the votes. See David Leip’s website.

    And you’re actually bringing up Goldwater/Mondale campaigns? Are you suggesting they got close to 2.5% of their respective party’s votes?

    =Did they even get a majority of their party’s reg. voters nationwide?

    You know Rob, being the fact that you don’t have a clue about voting behavior in general, your arguments are the equivelant of shooting blanks.

  56. Rob Says:

    We’re not talking about overall votes (In NJ and NV) as, once again, you’re extremely confused. We’re talking about the relasionship b/t a party’s registered voters and the actual number of votes that party gets. Try to put aside your childish bias and pick up a calculator for just a second.

    For like the forth time, Peroutka got about 1000 votes in NV, which translates to a number roughly 2.5% of the number of registered voters for IAP. Do you finally understand where that number came from? Divide 1000 by 40,000. Yep, not too difficult, right?

    Calculate what the cooresponding number is in NJ and you’ll begin to understand (!) the argument here. If you can actually accomplish this amazing mathmatical feat, you just might be on your way to understanding all of this. (I’ll give you a hint – it’s way more than 100%)

    Look, Richard Winger of Ballot Access News comes to the same conclusion (that the CP’s support is exaggrated because of the IAP designation), and he’s got a lot more clout around here than some mathmatically-challenged internet troll. Sorry to burst your bubble.

    (Seriously, tho, calculate the NJ number on your own, and then listen to the lightbulb burning brightly over you head. Write back with the answer, and we’ll take it from there)

  57. Cody Quirk Says:

    How do you explain Joel Hansen’s and Jonathan Hansen’s vote count to Peroutka then?

    Personally, I don’t like defending Peroutka, that wacko manipulated a lot of people in the CP and I regret voting for that bastard.

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